An Artist's Voice

 

 

 

Aesthetic Commentary

Jacob Collins: The Sensuous Nature of Light
by Michael Newberry

To talk about the art of Jacob Collins is to talk about his inquisitive "I."

Jacob Collins is a contemporary realist artist. He paints and draws portraits, landscapes, still-lifes, and nudes. Across the board, he imbues them all with sensuous light and an aptitude for finely wrought detail. He reminds me of a scientist who shines a light on an object to see it to full advantage. And like a scientist, he sees beauty in realizing his understanding of things. He told me "I find beauty in observing and in furthering my knowledge about light, the identity of plants and trees, and even such things as the nature of the formation of rocks and land masses."

Currently, he is working on completing a landscape project of 50 oil paintings and graphite studies, with the center piece being a large landscape 50 x 100". An exhibition of this landscape project will be on view May 8 - June 13, 2008 at Hirschl Alder Modern in New York City.

 

In this graphite on paper, Collins concerns himself only with the silhouette and shape of the land and tree masses, leaving the sky and water blank. This frees him to fully concentrate on details of the trees and land masses, as well as their relationships. In other studies he has concentrated on only the water or some other section of the total image.

In his student days in the 80's, aside from copying masterworks in Museums in New York and Italy, he studied anatomy to fully comprehend the curves and landmarks on the body's surfaces. Integral to his figure studies is his need to see what the light is doing on the surfaces.

 

This drawing, a study for the painting Redhead, shows the light and dark on her body. In addition, Collins has made notations, commenting on how to further enhance the lights and darks. A painter that is working with light has one enormous obstacle to overcome: light in real life is about a hundred times brighter than the re-creation of light with paint and canvas. An artist, in paint, can't very well shine a 500 watt halogen light in your face! One way an artist simulates light is to show the reflection of light on objects. Think of the Moon in relationship to the Sun. Another thing that an artist can do, and which Jacob has done, is to fine tune the nuances of light to the nth degree. Compare the different tones of highlights of her forehead, breast, and thigh. Once viewers have adjusted their eyes to a painting that has a great range of nuance between light and dark, their eyes will feel the brightness of the light.

I found it easy to talk with Jacob. Perhaps, because he is also an educator and a man who goes his own way. He is the founder of the Hudson River School for Landscape in Hunter, NY, the Founder of Grand Central Academy of Art in NYC, and the Founder of Water Street Atelier also in NYC. He has also taught at National Academy of Design, the Portrait Society of America, and the New York Academy of Art.

Drawing is my favorite Collin's painting. Spreading out in foreshortened perspective are the paper and tools for drawing. Even if you are not an artist, you might have experienced the joy in going into an art store and seeing and feeling the textures of the papers, looking at the pastels and charcoals, and wondering how much fun it would be to make art. Notice the different textures and subtle colors of the papers in Drawing. You might notice the  highlighted, ruffled, and delicately torn edges of several of the papers. I have fond memories of learning about different papers as an art student. One lesson we learned was to tear a really good acid-free 100% cotton rag paper to size using a straight edge--it's a very sensual experience. Collins gets that tactile beauty of the paper down exactly.

 

In the painting, Candace, Jacob is doing several impressive things. One is that the composition is powerfully divided between the light and dark of the fabrics, which is echoed by the high contrast of light and dark on her body. The modeling of her body is superb. Notice the form of her left thigh, how the form rotates up to the highlight on the iliac crest, and then gently descends onto the plain of her taught belly. Her flesh-tone color is natural, rich, and subtle. Notice the pinkish fingertips, the crisp pearl-color of her breasts, the cool blue mid-tone of her ribs, and the ochre highlights of her thighs.

In Candace, and in Collins' works in general, I cannot help but see hints of da Vinci's attention to molding forms, Rembrandt's hierarchy of light, and Bouguereau's delicate skin colorization.

A funny experience I have had with musicians has been their use of the word "stagnant" to describe painting. But Jacob describes light as it "bounces in soft and hard ways." A good place to see this "bounce" is by comparing the highlight on her forehead, to the shoulder's highlight silhouetting her chin, and to the highlight on her throat. Collins is "bouncing" the highlights through space.

The last aspect of this painting I will comment on is the exquisite detailing of the fabric. Collins painted her body first, then he set up the fabric with a mannequin so that he could paint the folds of the cloth undisturbed. By doing this, he could arrange the folds of the cloth to bring out their beauty, even down to the smallest details, and he gave himself all the time he needed do to them justice.

Many people wonder why artists go through all this work when they can simply copy a photograph. Collins volunteered that "photos are not as rich an experience as working from life." Let's take a cue from Collins, and enrich our "I's" by looking more closely at his universe of inquiry and light.

Photos curtsey of Jacob Collins.

Michael Newberry
Published in The New Individualist 2008


2008  Newberry, All rights reserved.